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the danger confronts us here in the united states or abroad. in june of 2009, fbi director robert mueller acknowledged the immense challenge facing the bureau stating: it is not sufficient for us as an organization to respond to a terrorist attack after it has occurred. it is important for us as an organization to develop the intelligence to anticipate a terrorist attack. developing intelligence, developing facts. in the past we looked at collecting facts for the courtroom. we now have to think of ourselves as gathering facts and painting a picture of a particular threat understanding the risk and moving to reduce that risk. and i couldn't agree more with the director's statement. and then on november the 5th, 2009, a gunman walked into the soldier readiness center at fort hood, texas, and shouted the classic jihadist term, allahu akbar, and opened fire on soldiers and civilians. he killed 14 and wounded 42 others. this was the most horrific terrorist attack on u.s. soil since 9/11. today we will examine the facts of the fort be hood case as we know them -- fort hood case as we know them
can create. a law enforcement fbi justice department's role to investigate those domestic terrorism, homeland security is more responsible for guarding our borders, northern, southern people coming by water and people coming by air as well as a lot of coordination with local law enforcement. so they have some law enforcement responsibilities, but if you are talking about giving and investigating a group you think may -- >> host: embrey to jump in because we need to go to the white house where they are going to do a moment of silence we want to listen and watch and come back to the discussion. [background noise] [background noise] [background noise] ♪ ♪ ♪ [background noise] >> a moment of silence this morning at the white house with the president and the first lady. you heard the bells rang at 8:46 eastern time when they were struck by their plan the 11 years ago on the september 11th 2001. nearly 3,000 americans died that day with the attacks of the world trade center, and the attacks of the pentagon here in washington. our cameras are up in new york where the world trade cent
and the fbi, and lying about and thrown overboard his closest aides one after another in an attempt to save himself. so that was an astonishing time. i do think that we learned a lot about hubris during the course of watergate and we have to be on constant alert for as for the most intriguing president, it will be impossible for me to say. they all brought such interesting qualities to the job. it's the hardest thing in the world to do, is to run successfully for president. a lot of people have not been successful, and it's in part because they simply were not up to it. those who eventually get to the oval office, however successful or unsuccessful they may have been in her administration, always bring unique qualities to the assignment of being a candidate. >> host: where we on august 9, 1974? >> guest: the white house lawn. i was in san clemente when the supreme court decision came down, and -- >> host: with the president. >> guest: with the president. he was out there at the time but it was an explosive development. we in effect knew it was over at that point, because if the tapes were c
in washington, chief of staff to the fbi director robert meueller and he began the justice department lawyer to fill the position as the attorney general for national security he then served as the homeland security adviser to president george w. bush and is now in private practice in washington. ken, please. spec the panel starts off with a reference to playboy magazine, but i will see if i can catch my breath and go forward. thanks very much, pete. good to be here. i've been asked to talk about three cases. 1i guess you could call a national security case and then number to a more regular case. let me start with the national security case and that is called blabber versus amnesty international. it's actually standing case but it's a standing case relating to a challenge to what's called the fisa amendment act passed in 2008, and was an amendment through a very substantial amount of the foreign intelligence surveillance act passed in 1978, and to understand the standing issue of the stakes at play you have to understand the merits a little bit so let me get into them. >> for those watching
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)